B-CELL ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA FOR ADULTS

B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia for adults is a disease that influences B lymphocytes, which are white blood cells that form in the soft interior of the bones known as the marrow. B lymphocytes are meant to grow into cells that assist in the defense against illnesses.

However, they transform into leukemia cells, which survive longer than the normal cells and proliferate rapidly. They gather in the bone marrow and then enter the bloodstream. They may then occur anywhere in a person’s body. Even though B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia for adults can not be cured in most instances, treatments can assist individuals in living longer and healthier lives.

SYMPTOMS

The severity of your symptoms is defined by the number of leukemia cells in your body. If you first develop B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia for adults, you could experience fatigue and fever. You may also have nausea and night sweats. If leukemia cells crowd out blood-making cells throughout your bone marrow, you will not have enough normal blood cells. Once this occurs, you will begin to feel light-headed, dizzy, or weak.

You could also experience the following symptoms:

  • Repeated bleeding, like gum bleeding or nosebleeds
  • Bruising
  • Recurring infections
  • Breathing difficulties

DIAGNOSIS

Your physician will perform a medical examination and inquire regarding your medical records. They might request you to do certain blood tests to determine if you have B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia for adults:

  • Complete blood count (CBC)
  • Peripheral blood smear

These tests may indicate that you have B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia for adults, like an excess of immature white blood cells or a deficiency of the two main kinds of blood cells, platelets, and red blood cells.

TREATMENT

  • Chemotherapy. You take drugs that travel across your bloodstream and destroy cancer cells all over your body during this treatment. These drugs could be given to you in three stages over the course of about two years.
  • Targeted therapy. This therapy employs medications that target particular regions of cancer cells. The medications used in this sort of treatment are often taken orally and daily. 
  • CAR T-cell therapy. It is a form of regenerative therapy approved by the FDA for adults whose B-cell ALL hasn’t improved with other medications. CAR T-cell therapy treats cancer by using part of your own immune cells, called t cells.

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