RIBOFLAVIN - Watsons Health

RIBOFLAVIN

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): None

GENERIC NAME(S): RIBOFLAVIN

 

Description: Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a naturally occuring substance necessary for many processes in the body.  It is importanct in the maintenance of many tissues in the body.

Pharmacokinetics:

Absorption: Readily absorbed from the upper GI tract.

Distribution: Widely distributed, including erythrocytes and liver. Crosses the placenta and enters breast milk.

Excretion: About 9% excreted in urine as unchanged drug.

Effective for:

  • Preventing and treating riboflavin deficiency and conditions related to riboflavin deficiency.

Possibly Effective for:

  • Cataracts, an eye disorder. People who eat more riboflavin as part of their diet seems to have a lower risk of developing cataracts. Also, taking supplements containing riboflavin plus niacin seems to help prevent cataracts.
  • High amounts of homocysteine in the blood (hyperhomocysteinemia). Some people are unable to convert the chemical homocysteine into the amino acid methionine. People with this condition, especially those with low riboflavin levels, have high amounts of homocysteine in the blood. Taking riboflavin for 12 weeks seems to reduce homocysteine levels by up to 40% in some people with this condition. Also, certain antiseizure drugs can increase homocysteine in the blood. Taking riboflavin along with folic acid and pyridoxine seems to lower homocysteine levels by 26% in people with high homocysteine levels due to antiseizure drugs.
  • Migraine headaches. Taking high-dose riboflavin (400 mg/day) seems to significantly reduce the number of migraine headache attacks. However, taking riboflavin does not appear to reduce the amount of pain or the amount of time a migraine headache lasts. Also, taking lower doses of riboflavin (200 mg/day) does not seem to reduce the number of migraine headache attacks.

Pregnancy Risk: Category C (Risk cannot be ruled out)

Riboflavin is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth. In some people, riboflavin can cause the urine to turn a yellow-orange color. When taken in high doses, riboflavin might cause diarrhea, an increase in urine, and other side effects.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Riboflavin is LIKELY SAFE for pregnant or breast-feeding women when taken in the amounts recommended. The recommended amounts are 1.4 mg per day for pregnant women and 1.6 mg per day in breast-feeding women. Riboflavin is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth in larger doses, short-term. Some research shows that riboflavin is safe when taken at a dose of 15 mg once every 2 weeks for 10 weeks.

Hepatitis, Cirrhosis, Billary obstruction: Riboflavin absorption is decreased in people with these conditions.

Minor Interaction: Be watchful with this combination

Drying medications (Anticholinergic drugs) interacts with RIBOFLAVIN

Some drying medications can affect the stomach and intestines. Taking these drying medications with riboflavin (vitamin B2) can increase the amount of riboflavin that is absorbed in the body. But it’s not known if this interaction is important.

Medications for depression (Tricyclic antidepressants) interacts with RIBOFLAVIN

Some medications for depression can decrease the amount of riboflavin in the body. This interaction is not a big concern because it only occurs with very large amounts of some medications for depression.

Phenobarbital (Luminal) interacts with RIBOFLAVIN

Riboflavin is broken down by the body. Phenobarbital might increase how quickly riboflavin is broken down in the body. It is not clear if this interaction is significant.

Probenecid (Benemid) interacts with RIBOFLAVIN

Probenecid (Benemid) can increase how much riboflavin is in the body. This might cause there to be too much riboflavin in the body. But it’s not known if this interaction is a big concern.

Dosing:

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:

For treating low levels of riboflavin (riboflavin deficiency) in adults: 5-30 mg of riboflavin (Vitamin B2) daily in divided doses.

For preventing migraine headaches: 400 mg of riboflavin (Vitamin B2) per day. It may take up to three months to get best results.

For preventing cataracts: a daily dietary intake of approximately 2.6 mg of riboflavin (Vitamin B2) has been used. A combination of 3 mg of riboflavin (Vitamin B2) plus 40 mg of niacin daily has also been used.

The daily recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) of riboflavin (Vitamin B2) are: Infants 0-6 months, 0.3 mg; infants 7-12 months, 0.4 mg; children 1-3 years, 0.5 mg; children 4-8 years, 0.6 mg; children 9-13 years, 0.9 mg; men 14 years or older, 1.3 mg; women 14-18 years, 1 mg; women over 18 years, 1.1 mg; pregnant women, 1.4 mg; and breastfeeding women, 1.6 mg.

Brands:

There are no brands containing this molecule.

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