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5 Avoidable Bad Habits That Can Hurt Your Brain

 

Do you sleep less? Are you overweight or obese? If your answer is yes, then you are damaging your brain every day. Let us take a detailed look at the bad habits that can hurt your brain.

  1. Higher Salt Consumption

High amount of salt intake is not good for your health. Salt is also a factor that contributes to high blood pressure. According a study, too much salt can increase the risk of high blood pressure which eventually can result to cognitive defects and increased risk of stroke. Stroke can lead to severe damage to your brain. Make healthier food choices, look for salt quantities in the foods that you consume and reduce the amount of salt when you cook. This will keep your brain healthy.

  1. Lack of Sleep

Lack of sleep or not sleeping well can result in various problems. Adults who lack sleep may have memory and attention problems. Continuous sleep deprivation harms your memory as well and has long-term impacts on your brain. During your sleep, there are complex mechanisms that get rid of toxic-by-products that build up in your brain all the day. A lack of sleep can hinder these mechanisms, which in turn can result in the accumulation of harmful substances. This accumulation can hurt your brain severely. Sleep deprivation is also associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

  1. Bad Hearing

We are exposed to noise everywhere and this further leads to hearing impairments. As per a study performed at the John Hopkins University, hearing-impaired people are at high risk for cognitive deterioration by 30 to 40%. This denotes that exposure to high noise levels can damage your ears and your brain. Avoid listening to music at higher volumes for a long time and use ear plugs when you are in a noisy environment so that you can prevent hearing impairments.

  1. Being Overweight

Obesity can cause an array of health problems like diabetes, cardiovascular disease and deterioration of cognitive functions. According to a study, overweight people are at risk for greater deterioration of cognitive functions by 22% than people who have normal weight. If you are overweight or obese, start shedding some pounds which will be good for your health. It is recommended to do exercises or any type of physical activity for 30 minutes a day to help you reduce and maintain weight within the normal range.

  1. Less Socially Active

Feeling lonely can trigger inflammatory processes and stress in your brain. According to a study conducted at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, people who had less social connections are also suffering from severe cognitive deterioration.

Eating nutritious food, maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, having adequate sleep and relaxing with your loved ones can help you have a strong body and a sharp mind.

 

-Medical Observer

 

References
Blackwell, T., Yaffe, K., Laffan, A., Ancoli-Israel, S., Redline, S., Ensrud, K. E., … Stone, K. L. (2014). Associations of Objectively and Subjectively Measured Sleep Quality with Subsequent Cognitive Decline in Older Community-Dwelling Men: The MrOS Sleep Study. Sleep, 37(4), 655–663. http://doi.org/10.5665/sleep.3562
Gottesman, R. F., Schneider, A. L. C., Albert, M., Alonso, A., Bandeen-Roche, K., Coker, L., … Mosley, T. H. (2014). Midlife hypertension and 20-year cognitive change: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Neurocognitive Study. JAMA Neurology, 71(10), 1218–1227. http://doi.org/10.1001/jamaneurol.2014.1646
Hawkley, L. C., & Cacioppo, J. T. (2010). Loneliness Matters: A Theoretical and Empirical Review of Consequences and Mechanisms. Annals of Behavioral Medicine : A Publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, 40(2), 10.1007/s12160–010–9210–8. http://doi.org/10.1007/s12160-010-9210-8
Lin, F. R., Metter, E. J., O’Brien, R. J., Resnick, S. M., Zonderman, A. B., & Ferrucci, L. (2011). Hearing Loss and Incident Dementia. Archives of Neurology, 68(2), 214–220. http://doi.org/10.1001/archneurol.2010.362
Singh-Manoux, A., Czernichow, S., Elbaz, A., Dugravot, A., Sabia, S., Hagger-Johnson, G., … Kivimäki, M. (2012). Obesity phenotypes in midlife and cognition in early old age: The Whitehall II cohort study. Neurology, 79(8), 755–762. http://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182661f63

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